Where the Money Goes

| |

The money raised by the Sea to Sea 2008 Bike Tour will support the fight against global poverty.

Working through the Christian Reformed World Relief Committee (CRWRC), Christian Reformed World Missions (CRWM), the CRC Foundation, and Partners Worldwide, Sea to Sea will help to fund initiatives that range from trying to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS in Africa to programs that help poor farmers improve their crop yields in Central America.

“Because of the sheer magnitude and uniqueness of this project and the fact that people, churches, and agencies are working together, we can do far more to fulfill God’s call to help those living in poverty than each of us could on our own,” said Claire Elgersma, chair of the Sea to Sea 2008 steering committee.

Cyclists are asked to raise at least $10,000 each (or $4,000 for cyclists riding one leg of the route). Organizers hope to obtain corporate sponsorship to cover tour expenses so that all of the money raised by the riders will go to fight poverty.

Programs to be funded by the tour include

  • an HIV/AIDS program in Nigeria;
  • Christian libraries in Russia;
  • a prison and a gang ministry in Guatemala;
  • a network of Christian businesspeople who can help those who are in poverty to create and maintain their own businesses;
  • loans for people to invest in a small business to generate income;
  • projects that help poor farmers improve their agriculture techniques, increase    their crop yields, and protect the environment.

The funds also will help in leadership training by advocating for the oppressed and offering training in civil rights, human rights, peace-building, and biblical justice, and in discipling believers to be radical followers of Jesus who live with sensitivity to their culture but not in subjection to it.

Cyclist profiles are available on the Sea-to-Sea website with links to online giving. To donate in the name of a cyclist or to inquire about becoming a tour sponsor, call 1-888-CRC-BIKE or visit www.seatosea.org.


About the Author

David Raakman works in the CRC’s communications office.

X