A Revival among the Mano

| |

When God has a work to do among his people, he sets them praying.

—Matthew Henry

I am often asked, “How did you ever get involved with the Mano people, a thousand kilometers (600 miles) from your place in Guinea?” All I can reply is: “God.”

The Mano, who live in the forest area of Guinea, have traditionally been animists, worshiping rocks, trees, and the like. The New Testament was brought to them in 1978, and since then the gospel has made many inroads among them.

The Mano people recently sent their first missionary, Joseph Mamy, to another tribe that has not heard the gospel. Through Mamy, God arranged an invitation for me to teach at the annual Mano men’s retreat.

Three years ago, a few of the Mano people saw some growing danger signs in their community and started to pray that God would revive their churches.

About two years ago I had a vivid dream of revival with thousands of Africans and myself on our faces before God weeping out our sins. On returning to Guinea in 2005 we asked for God’s direction: “Lord what would you have me (us) do?” The study of revival became the clear response.

God used the men’s retreat to encourage the Mano to pray for revival for their churches and for Guinea. Twenty-four people have started to pray around the clock in one-hour shifts for the next four months.

During the retreat I asked the Mano gathered there to pray a blessing on Joshua Sesay (a Sierra Leonian friend who has planted a church here in Conakry) and me as we knelt on the cement floor. One hundred people prayed all at once in Manoir with a newfound fervor for the love of Jesus. All we could say was Wala mama, “Thank you God,” and we left much richer than when we came.

About the Author

John Span has served with Christian Reformed World Missions in Guinea, West Africa, since 2000.
X