Arizona Church Includes Temporary Shelter in Multi-use Space

Arizona Church Includes Temporary Shelter in Multi-use Space
When its main shelter is full in the winter, Flagstaff Shelter Services works with partnering churches to supply overflow shelter a week at a time.
Amy Martin

Hope Community Church is a multi-use facility in Flagstaff, Ariz. The Christian Reformed congregation shares its building with a Navajo church, Chinese and Korean ministries, and a Spanish-speaking group that is just getting started. Deacon Steve Hall said it can sometimes be difficult to schedule all of the activities, but the church has prioritized serving its local emergency shelter, Flagstaff Shelter Services, as an overflow shelter.

“We have been a part of this for three years now and plan to continue doing so in the near future. The shelter provides the overseeing staff, and we supply the heated space for about 20 people to be able to have a warm place to sleep,” Hall said. “We all cooperate and make do with the space that the Lord has provided us.”

Flagstaff Shelter Services runs a year-round shelter for people experiencing homelessness. The organization also provides services to help people find permanent homes. During the winter months when the shelter facility is full, this arrangement with neighboring churches allows them to provide more beds. They call the overflow shelter “Sanctuary.”

This year Hope Community held the overflow shelter from January 6 to 13. The men and staff stay for about 12 hours. Volunteers from the congregation supply breakfast, usually bringing egg and sausage casseroles that can be served warm.

“The Lord has been good to us and we want to do everything we can to help our community,” said Hall, who serves as the overflow shelter coordinator for Hope Community Church.

About the Author

Alissa Vernon is a news editor at The Banner.

See comments (1)

Comments

This is a fantastic way for churches of various traditions can work together.

X