Using Talents to Share the Gospel

Using Talents to Share the Gospel
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Many people have personal skills and talents that can be used to share the gospel. Quilters, for example, can talk while working together on a large project, and conversation can turn to spiritual subjects.

My talents as a graphic designer allowed me to create the pictured artwork, which I have used to share the good news (Isa. 52.7; Luke 8:1).

To make the piece, I used electrical conduits (bent with the heat from a stove), 4-by-8-foot wallboard (background), wood (frame), modeling clay (wheat), plaster (clouds), latex paint, and cardboard (hands). Each element of the piece represents a characteristic of God or a part of the Christian life.

Most of us eat bread every day in some form or another. The wheat kernels at the top of the stalks remind us to feed on Jesus, the living bread of life, and on the Word of God by faith and with thanksgiving (John 6:51, Matt. 4:4).

The three stalks of wheat represent our triune God: God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Further down is a red cross, representing the shed blood at the crucifixion of our Lord (1 Pet. 1:18-19).

These symbols remind us of the communion we take, the bread and red juice or wine representing our Lord’s broken body and shed blood (Matt. 26:26-28).

The clouds tell us that the sun has set but will rise again.

In the background are two other crosses as there were at Golgotha. The man hanging on the left cross said, “This man has done nothing wrong. ... Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom” (Luke 23:41-42).

Finally we come to the raised hands, each with a drop of blood on it. One might ask why the hands are raised. Are they hands of praise, hands asking for mercy, or hands asking for forgiveness? (Ps. 28:2; 34:2).

Such a question is open-ended, and one must ask, “Why are my hands raised?”

The main reason for using my God-given talents now is to invite people to have a cup of tea or coffee, and when they ask about the contents of the huge mural, the opportunity is provided, visually and audibly, to present the gospel.

About the Author

Fred Stringer is actively retired in Orangeville, Ont. He is a graphic designer who also did ministry in prisons, Extendicare, retirement and nursing homes. He attends Orangeville Christian Reformed Church.

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