In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende

When a massive snowstorm shuts down Brooklyn for several days, the lives of three people intersect in life-altering ways.

Richard Bowmaster, a university professor in his sixties, lives a secluded, timid existence and tries to suppress the painful memories of his life in Brazil in the 1980s. On the day of the storm, he smashes into the car of Evelyn Ortega, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala. Terrified, the young woman drives away, but only after Richard has a chance to fling his card with his home address into the car.

Soon after, Evelyn, shaking with fear, shows up at his door. Richard welcomes her in, but has no idea how to help her. His tenant, visiting Chilean professor Lucia Maraz, comes to his aid.

As the storm continues to rage, the sequestered trio share their stories. Their narratives span years of political and personal turmoil in Brazil, Guatemala, Chile, Canada, and the United States. When Evelyn finally discloses the real reason for her visit, Richard and Lucia are faced with a reality that they can’t ignore. The three set off on a dangerous journey, choosing to walk the road of compassion and “natural justice.”

In this riveting novel, which contains several sexual scenes, Allende explores the reality that violence, murder, human trafficking, and domestic abuse know no national borders, but neither do compassion, love, and a willingness to seek truth and do what is right. (Atria Books)

About the Author

Sonya VanderVeen Feddema is a freelance writer and a member of Covenant CRC in St. Catharines, Ontario.
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