Childhood Missionary Dream Becomes Reality

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As a young boy, George Ahiome told his mom and grandpa that he wanted to become a pilot and preach the gospel as a missionary.

And while he won’t be flying planes, Ahiome will be testifying to the gospel this year in Nigeria as one of Christian Reformed World Missions’ (CRWM) newest career missionaries.

Ahiome, along with his wife, Sara, will serve in Abuja, Nigeria, as coordinator of CRWM’s Transformational Network. The network, also called the Daniel Center, gathers Nigerian Christians and organizations together to seek Christ-centered renewal in every societal sector.

Ahiome’s role will be to encourage, connect, and train these leaders for seeking God’s kingdom in their areas of service. Sara Ahiome, meanwhile, hopes to support Christian business people looking to apply the gospel to their work.

Born and raised in Nigeria, Ahiome is intimately familiar with the people of Nigeria and its culture. He also has strong ties to the CRCNA, having graduated from Hillcrest School in Jos, Nigeria, and completed his undergraduate degree at Calvin College.

Over the years, he has befriended many missionaries serving in Nigeria and seen the missions opportunities in the region.

“Many Nigerian Christians don't see the need to restore the earth, as they view it only as a temporary abode until they go to their ‘real home’—heaven,” says Ahiome. “The church is seen as an end to itself rather than an agent of the kingdom.

“People pray for political, social, environmental, and economic change, but they expect that change to come about miraculously and from an external source.”

Many churches, he notes, reinforce this mindset. Instead of equipping and sending out members to make a difference, they focus on congregational maintenance.

The Ahiomes are excited to share the biblical worldview perspective that presents Nigerian Christians with an alternative role—to live out their faith in all they do.

They will work with youth, pastors, businesspeople, teachers, Christian legislators, and others intent on bringing God’s kingdom to full expression. While the work may not always be easy, they know God will lead them through every step.

The Ahiomes said they hope to have raised enough support to begin working in Nigeria by the fall. Until then, they will continue praying for the people of Nigeria and the work God has called them to do.

“Many Nigerians are ‘lights put under baskets,’” said George Ahiome. “[We are] excited to identify those lights and see how God will work within Nigeria and Africa.”

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Christian Reformed World Missions

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