Aboriginal Ministry Director Receives Medal

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Bert Adema, director of the Indian Metis Christian Fellowship in Regina, Saskatchewan, received the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for “outstanding service to Saskatchewan.”

Bert Adema (right) with Saskatchewan Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield.

The Indian Metis Christian Fellowship (IMCF) is one of three aboriginal ministries in Canada supported by the Christian Reformed Church.

Adema was humble about being a Diamond Jubilee Medal recipient, quickly pointing out that while he was the individual receiving the medal, it is the good work of IMCF that is really being recognized and honored.

IMCF is located in an inner-city neighborhood in North Central Regina. The area is so plagued by poverty, addictions, gangs, and crime that in 2007 one Canadian national magazine called it “the worst neighborhood in Canada.”

IMCF has worked hard to change and improve the situation. It offers a safe space, free coffee, a courtesy telephone, the local newspaper and other reading materials, games, prayer circles, and soup and bannock lunches, among other things.

Adema was nominated for the Diamond Jubilee Medal by Warren McCall, a Member of the Legislative Assembly in whose constituency the ministry is located.

Adema was presented with the award by Saskatchewan Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield at a formal ceremony at Government House in Regina.

The Diamond Jubilee Medal was created to mark the 2012 celebrations of the 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. The medal is a tangible way to honor those who have dedicated themselves to service to their fellow citizens, their community, and their country.

In 2011 Adema received another award, the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, also for his work with IMCF. “When you’re doing quality stuff, it gets recognized,” he said. He said the recognition also helps the CRC to know that it is supporting good work in Regina.

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