Good Stewardship Means Giving Up Car for Halifax Pastor

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Rev. David Vroege, pastor of All Nations Christian Reformed Church in Halifax, Nova Scotia, might be the only active CRC pastor who does not own his own car. Instead, for more than a year Vroege has taken part in a car-share arrangement.

He and his family live in the heart of the city, close to their church and other amenities.

They found that they were increasingly choosing to walk, bike, or bus, so they decided to forgo their car when the lease came up for renewal.

Vroege had also been making contact with a local entrepreneur who was launching a car-share business around the corner from the church.

The Vroeges felt like this was a great way to accomplish many of their ideals: care for creation, good physical care, meeting the neighbors, stewardly use of money, and setting an example for others. So they decided to try it.

They have never looked back.

To car-share, the Vroeges pay an annual fee of about $200  and a per-hour fee when they’re using a vehicle. The company covers all insurance, repairs, and gas. They can book a vehicle three months or three minutes in advance, for a weekend or a day.

Vroege’s son, Lian, thinks it is “pretty neat” that they get to drive different cars all the time. But the biggest advantage of being a no-car family is one that Vroege is passionate about: talking to people.

He said, “Being on foot in the city so much is a great way to meet people—a pretty essential part of following Jesus! I can’t walk more than a few blocks without seeing someone in the community I know.”

About the Author

Brenda Visser is the Banner's regional news correspondent for classis Eastern Canada.

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Comments

May his tribe increase

I think it is great that Rev. David Vroege lives in a city, and he decided not to own a car. Using a car share service like ZipCar or iGo are a good choice for some people. Others who choose a car, a minivan, an SUV or a bus also show their care for creation, good physical care, meeting the neighbors, stewardly use of money, and setting an example for others.

It depends on the person and their needs, and we should not fall into the trap of saying that one person's choice of transportation is more "Christian" or show more care for creation than another. From the article, it seems as if Pastor Vroege has just made a personal choice, and he is not trying to impose that on others, so I commend him for that and I don't think he falls into the category of an extreme environmentalist.

We should look at things from a Christian perspective, and use our God given ability to reason and use logic. God gave us minds to explore His creation and understand it from a scientific perspective. For that reason we should not blindly take the side of extreme environmentalists, who sometimes deceptively adopt the cloak of "Christianity" to push their leftist ideas.

A good website to find out more is http://www.cornwallalliance.org/

As they correctly point out, some seemingly "compassionate" or "environmentalist" policies could actually hurt the poor that Jesus commands us to help:

"Despite the fact that the scientific case for dangerous, manmade global warming is crumbling in the wake of Climategate and other revelations of scientific malpractice by leading alarmists and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, supporters of policies to fight global warming are still pushing for restrictive energy policies.

But those policies will hurt working families and the poor by driving up energy prices. And since energy goes into everything we consume, these rising energy prices will make everything more expensive--especially the most basic things like food and clothing and shelter.

American evangelicals strongly support greater energy freedom, not restriction."

I think it is great that Pastor Vroege is making contact with people for Christ by walking around the neighborhood. That works for his city and his situation, and others meet people for Christ by driving to visit the sick in hospitals, and are meeting people at the gas station or the highway rest stop. All is for the glory of God and we should not look down on car drivers or look up to those who choose not to drive.

I’d like to comment in Christian love on this story about Creation Care, and how transportation decisions might affect the environment God created. As I have said, this does not question Pastor Vroege’s faith or his personal decision to walk or use a car service. That is a personal choice, and as I have said it is a good choice for many people. I think it is great that Pastor Vroege is making contact with people for Christ by walking around the neighborhood. That works for his city and his situation, and others meet people for Christ by driving to visit the sick in hospitals, and are meeting people at the gas station or the highway rest stop. All is for the glory of God and we should not think badly of car drivers or those who choose not to drive.

We should look at things from a Christian perspective, and use our God given ability to reason and use logic. God gave us minds to explore His creation and understand it from a scientific perspective. For that reason we should not blindly take the side of extreme environmentalists, who sometimes deceptively adopt the cloak of "Christianity" to push their leftist ideas.

A good website to find out more is http://www.cornwallalliance.org/

I think it is important to discuss the idea that some seemingly "compassionate" or "environmentalist" policies could actually hurt the poor that Jesus commands us to help:

As the Cornwall Alliance site says, "...policies will hurt working families and the poor by driving up energy prices. And since energy goes into everything we consume, these rising energy prices will make everything more expensive--especially the most basic things like food and clothing and shelter.

American evangelicals strongly support greater energy freedom, not restriction."

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